Tag Archives: Irish Set Dance

Eat your greens and keep on dancing!

Having just seen a recent photo of me on Facebook, a friend commented that I just keep looking younger. If the items below are to be believed it must be because I dance often, am always on the move and I love Brussels sprouts! As you’ll see, the emerging theme of this month’s blog seems to be: keep moving to stay young at heart and fit and healthy in mind and body.

So here’s where you’ll find me moving in May. If you’re able to join me for some Nia classes this month, then a new block of 5 classes begins on Monday 8th May at Keep Fit Darlington at 2.30 p.m. and at the Pioneering Care Centre at 6.30 p.m. It would be great to see you!

I’m looking forward to the Day of Dance in Saltaire on 13th May because I get to go to a Nia class with Lynette McFadden who will be leading a workshop there. It will be such a joy to join in as a participant!  I’ll be rounding off the day with an Irish Set Dance workshop (Irish Set Dance is why I started doing Nia in the first place – to stay fit enough to continue).

And finally, a lot closer to home, I’m delighted to have been invited to share some Nia at the Sparklicious Ladies’ Retreat Day in July. You can read all about it below.

Have a great month

Anne


Nia move of the month – Elbow Strike Side

Elbow Strikes all start from Sumo Stance or Bow Stance and use the opposite hand for support to direct the strike. They invoke the power and precision of the martial arts.
They help to release stress and condition the upper arms, chest and back.

For Elbow Strike Side, use the opposite hand to push on your fist, in order to drive your elbow out to the side.


What I’m reading

Eat your greens – Brussels sprouts in Dementia Research

Who knew? It seems that sprouts are being investigated as a potential cure for Alzheimer’s Disease. More

And if you’re not keen on sprouts, you could try dancing:

Why is dancing so good for your brain?

Dancing improves brain function on a variety of levels. Two recent studies show how different types of practice allow dancers to achieve peak performance by blending cerebral and cognitive thought processes with muscle memory and ‘proprioception’ held in the cerebellum. Through regular aerobic training that incorporates some type of dance at least once a week anyone can maximize his or her brain function. Continue reading this article from “Psychology today”.

Debbie Rosas. Photograph provided by Nia Technique (www.nianow.com).

And if you don’t consider yourself a dancer, just keep moving.  “Through Movement We Find Health” is the Nia philosophy and core belief, reiterated by Debbie Rosas, Co-creator of Nia, in a recent newsletter:

Science has proven that movement:
1. Produces new brain cells and their connections.
2. Stimulates the brain. The brain is a highly sensitive communicator designed to detect motion, cues, and patterns.
3. Enhances neurotransmitter, nerve connections and their growth.
4. Helps to form new blood vessels.
5. Helps regulate and reduce stress.
6. Boosts the production of brain chemicals that enhance learning.


What I’m watching

Dancing for Dementia

A video report from BBC Scotland. Watch it here.


Dates for your diary

CalendarNia classes

New blocks of five classes begin at Pioneering care Centre and Keep Fit Darlington begin on Monday 8 May.

Full details on the Classes and Events page.


Saltaire Day of Dance


Saturday, 13th May, Victoria Hall, Saltaire, BD18 3JS

Exercise your brain and body by trying out a form of dance you’ve never tried before. Everything from Argentine Tango to Charleston and from Disco to Swing.

There’ll be Nia with Lynette MacFadden at 12.30, and I will be doing a beginners’ Irish Set Dance workshop later in the afternoon.
Full details of all dance workshops.


Sparklicious Summer Retreat Day

Saturday 8 July 2017, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.,
Hardwick Park, Sedgefield TS21 2DN

What stops you from shining?
What dulls your sparkle?

Join Karen Hughes for a wonderful day of rediscovery and soul searching to find and release your inner sparkle!
This is a women only retreat and is exclusively brought to you by Sparklicious Living.

A taste of Nia and complementary therapies are included in the day.


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Keep Calm and Carry On: why is self care so hard?

I was recently wondering why so many of the inspirational writers I come across these days are advocating self-care. I wrote about it last month  and have a few more self-care tips to share with you this month too.

It seems to me that the “Keep calm and carry on” spirit marked those of us who grew up in the years after the war. Our parents lived through it and rationing only came to an end a few years before I was born.  Making do was the order of the day and carrying on in spite of adversity was seen as almost saintly. “Looking after Number One” (i.e. yourself) typified selfishness in a bad way.

Thinking about all this brought to mind one of my favourite books, Bill Bryson’s “Notes from a small island”.  In describing his much-loved adopted country, Bryson observes that the British have sayings like “Mustn’t grumble” and “Let’s make do and mend”. The latter was the title of a pamphlet issued by the Ministry of Information during World War II.

He also says – and this part always makes me smile – that it’s a shame that communism was left to the Russians when the British would have managed it so much better! For Brits, going without is second nature; they are great at pulling together in the face of adversity; they don’t mind queuing; they accept rationing and have “a natural gift for making jokes about authority without seriously challenging it.” He asserts that the British would have taken communism “in their stride, with good heart and wihout excessive cheating. In point of fact, until about 1970 it wouldn’t have made the slightest discernible difference to most people’s lives.”

I wonder if he would be of the same opinion if he were writing today? And I wonder if all this goes some way to explaining why some of us find it so difficult to take care of ourselves? It’s not a concept we grew up with – quite the reverse! I hope some of the tips below will help.

Have a great month
Anne


Nia move of the month – Elbow Strike Back

Elbow Strikes all start from Sumo Stance or Bow Stance and use the opposite hand for support to direct the strike. They invoke the power and precision of the martial arts.
They help to release stress and condition the upper arms, chest and back.

For Elbow Strike Back, use the opposite hand to push on your fist, in order to drive your elbow back behind you.


What I’m reading

Here are those self-care tips, courtesy of Cheryl Richardson:

20 ridiculously simple ways to live longer better

  • Upon waking, stretch your body in some fun way for five minutes.
  • Drink half your body weight in water (in ounces).
  • Refuse to rush. When making commitments or appointments, put space in your calendar in between.
  • Look for one thing in nature that astonishes you.
    Read more

Dates for your diaryCalendar

Nia classes
New 5-week blocks of Nia classes have started at Keep Fit Darlington and at the Pioneering Care Centre. Two more weeks of the present block at Bishop Middleham.
Full details on the Classes and Events page.

Unfortunately, the Ageless Grace class at Bishop Middleham wasn’t sufficiently well-attended for it to continue.

Saltaire Day of Dance
Saturday, 13th May, Victoria Hall, Saltaire, BD18 3JS

Exercise your brain and body by trying out a form of dance you’ve never tried before. Everything from Argentine Tango to Charleston and from Disco to Swing.

There’ll be Nia with Lynette MacFadden at 12.30, and I will be doing a beginners’ Irish Set Dance workshop later in the afternoon.
Full details of all dance workshops.


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What is Irish Set Dance?

Irish Set Dance is great fun, a great way to meet people and to keep fit.

A “set” is four couples and a “Set Dance” is made up of several parts or “figures” each made up of a number of moves. They were danced at home (the names of the moves reflect this – dance “at home”, “round the house”) or people would meet at the crossroads between villages, put down some wooden boards to dance on and local musicians would play.  Most dances include a “social” figure, where the lady dances with each gent in the set in turn, returning to her own partner at the end.

Set dancing has enjoyed a huge revival in recent years. Workshops, classes and ceilidhs are held around the world and a recent workshop in the south of England attracted participants from all corners of the UK and Ireland, as well as from France, Germany and the Czech Republic (there may have been others we didn’t meet).

Information on classes and events around the world is published in “Set Dancing News” magazine and on the Set Dancing News Website.

And here’s a small taste of what it’s about:

 

Research shows Irish Set Dance can help with Parkinson’s Disease

Irish Set Dance is great fun, but did you know it can also benefit your health?Celtic knotwork

It seems that an Italian doctor on holiday in Ireland watched someone showing symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease walk into a room with the aid of a stick and then join in the set dancing apparently perfectly able! Amazed, he set out to find out if this was exceptional or could Irish Set Dance really help with Parkinson’s symptoms.

Read more about his research.

Read more about Irish Set Dance or contact us to arrange a taster session or workshop.